Music Industry Worth £3.5bn To British Economy

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So the music industry is worth £3.5bn to the British Economy. Well not much of this filters down to any of the musicians I know. The UK should be rightly proud of much of the music that we have given the world, The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Elgar, Holst, etc but we also produce a lot of music that is successful in terms of sales and revenue but not worth the disc its lasered onto. Yes I know it’s an opinion, after all it is my blog, but I think of music in terms of legacy and longevity as well as how it influences the work of others.  One of the worst features of the industry is the ‘manufactured’ and relentless marketing of bands like One Direction. Yes they sell truck loads but they are a product not a band and lyrically they stink like stuff you might find at the bottom of a stable. I can think of countless musicians, artists, writers etc that I have encountered who had the talent but were never found. Thank heavens for the off switch on the car radio and the eclectic music that I have as mp3 files waiting for emergencies; from Metallica to Mozart and stations in between. My musical taste is wide so here are the lyrics from one of my Americana/Alt Country style songs and I put it out in ‘blog land’ as a tribute to all those unsung artists out there who continue to produce great music.

One thing that I forgot to mention when posting this blog originally is the number of musicians who are tax exiles or have off shore accounts. David Bowie, Phil Collins, Mick Jagger and numerous others squirrel their money away in other countries whilst we tighten our belts and are taxed everywhere until it hurts. Some of the worst offenders are U2. I loved their early albums and saw them live at my University in 1982 but their musical appeal has gone down hill for me espcially given the hypocasy of Bono. He regulary preaches against poverty, hunger etc etc but for 20 years avoided tax and now the band flush their money through the Netherlands. Nice one Bono!

Another Town

Left my key with the desk clerk

Stepped out into the sun

The parking lot was hazy

Ripples on the road

The neon sign showed vacancy

Another empty room

Following the white line

I left another town

Signposts point this way and that

On highway 441

Small towns disappearing

In the rear view mirror

Cherokee to Gatlinburg

I drove the Smokey trail

From Carolina to Tennessee

As I hit another town

In Gatlinburg I saw her

She stared as I drove by

With eyes of unbridled kindness

On her way to Sevierville

Pie ‘n’ coffee at a diner

Pigeon Forge Tennessee

I watched as her eyes danced

In the lights of another town

She spoke of dreams hickory fires

And love lost and found

Mountain roads and winter snows

Laughing children’s cries

The paths she’d journeyed on and on

The strains of life it showed

And in her eyes I saw a sadness

As we sat in another town

She left the table smiling

And thanked me for the ride

Disappeared into the night

Like a Cherokee mountain star

I paid the check left 15 %

Stepped out into the night

The parking lot was empty

As I left another town

Just outside of Pigeon Forge

On the way to Sevierville

A trooper’s flare alerted me

To what was up ahead

It was there that I saw her

She stared as I drove by

The eyes of unbridled kindness

Staring at the sky

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4 responses to “Music Industry Worth £3.5bn To British Economy

    • Must be your dry sense of humour. Thanks for the post. Oh and with reference to grandad I have a long time until my 17 month old son makes me one. What music floats your boat?

      • I’m a little schitz about music – sometimes I’ll switch to R3 or get all pompous with the Classic fm, behind the wheel… I was the school punk…and that horrible man Morrissey, of course. I lost touch round about acid house. My boy is a prog rocker , which is treachery.

        17 m is joyful, envious.

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